Tuesday, 25 October 2011

Life with teenagers - at least they know how to make a cup of tea ...

As I sat in my kitchen attempting to write an essay on Children's Literature this morning I was interrupted regularly by the rumbumptious banging of my two sons playing the x box in the next room. That may not be a real word but it describes their behaviour well. Now at the ages of 12 and 13 they are tall, muscular and scarily strong. They also have developed an aversion to the shower ...

How did all this happen? It doesn't seem 5 minutes ago that I was writing my first blog post and they were two darling boys - all golden and soft with early bedtimes and a penchant  Noddy. People told me to make the most of the time when they were young, but, to be honest, I dismissed this advice as the first signs of senility.

Perhaps its because I was still in the cold grips of Post Natal Depression that I wanted their childhood to be over quickly? I was frustrated by them and their needs. I felt alone and inadequate. But now, with hindsight, I look back at those days with a fond nostalgia! Not that I'd want them back ... I am quite happy that my boys are capable of making me a cup of tea and a bacon sandwich. In my eyes I have achieved Nirvana in the parenting stakes!

But still ... it does amaze me to think that I actually gave birth to these two hulking 'near-adults'. Their hormones are buzzing and when they do actually venture into the bathroom, after lots of screaming and gesticulating from me, the place ends up smelling like a tarts boudoir. Less talcum powder and bubble bath - more Lynx body spray and hair gel.

So far, despite the fact that they tower over me, I am still in control. Well... when I say control I mean actually that we work well together. They know what side their bread is buttered on and they know the rules of the house. Al though they might attempt a minor rebellion sometimes, at the moment they are good boys, intelligent boys and boys of whom I am immensely proud.

Neither of them are making bad choices right now, although it scares me to write those smug words, after all its early days and they are still quite young. But I know that they have made choices of which I approve. The eldest, when faced with an invitation to go to the park after school and drink cider (OH MY GOD) said no and told me about it. He considered such behaviour stupid and chavvy. I can't tell you how relieved I was that he thought that way and wasn't swayed by peer pressure.

All you can do as a parent is try to equip your children with the tools to cope with the life they face. Of course they will face invitations to drink, possibly to try drugs, but I hope they will come through all that. Right now, when I think of what they could be doing I am soooooooo happy they are being rumbumptious on the x box in my lounge ...


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8 comments:

Elaine said...

I've come from the blog-hop...

This struck a chord with me (my two eldest can just about manage cereal and toast!) as this is going to come to me sooner than I think and I can feel the time flying past already.

sarah at secret housewife said...

Hi Elaine. Thanks for coming over! I do look at my boys and wonder how I became the mother of 2 secondary school children. It is quite bizarre! Good luck with yours x

Pauline said...

I feel for you. I have twin grand-daughters who turn 13 in December. They turned up on my doorstep yesterday afternoon bawling like babies because they had seen a dead lamb. Dead calves they see here on our farm but a dead little lamb and the hormones run amok. And, of course, it's the opposite problem with the bathroom (although the same end result), they would run the hot water dry they are in there so often and for so long. It all reminds me why I love having progressed from motherhood to grandmother.

Caz said...

Thank heaven for little boys (and I love the word 'chav'!)

Caroline Enstock said...

I found you via Britmums - love the blog. My boys are 1 and 8 but I live in fear of those teenage years !! I have a 13 year old daughter 11 year old daughter and a 5 year old daughter so a lot of teenage years to come - I'll hold onto my hat (and read your bog for advice along the way !!)

sarah at secret housewife said...

Hi!Pauline I think being a grandma must be wonderful! All the joy and not too much of the angst!!

Caz - hope you are ok?! Boys are definitely interesting!!

Hi Caroline! Thanks for popping ovcer. Wow! You have your hands full with 5 children!! Think I should maybe come over to you for advice instead!!

Sarah x

studyingparent said...

You made me laugh with the description of the 'Tart's Boudoir'
With 3 teenage daughters, all who can cook pasta & make tea, my whole upstairs reeks of Impulse, & hairspray and resounds to shrieks & loud music. One school morning on being called to empty the dishwasher, one of the twins (age 13) replied - I can't I'm doing my make-up!!!!

Fun times though - and the floods of tears when they watch Titanic for the umpteenth time!!!

Wouldn't go back to pre-school times for any money!

Emily (@amummytoo) said...

This post made me smile. My kids are 4 and newborn, but I do occasionally look ahead to the teen years with dread. I hope my little girl isn't as rude to me as I was to my mum, that's for sure! (Found you through the BritMums blog hop.)